Open publishing

Open publishing is a process of creating news or other content that is transparent to the readers. They can contribute a story and see it instantly appear in the pool of stories publicly available. Those stories are filtered as little as possible to help the readers find the stories they want. Readers can see editorial decisions being made by others. They can see how to get involved and help make editorial decisions. If they can think of a better way for the software to help shape editorial decisions, they can copy the software because it is free and change it and start their own site. If they want to redistribute the news, they can, preferably on an open publishing site. Internet sites run on open publishing software allow anyone with Internet access to visit the site and upload content directly without having to penetrate the filters of traditional media. Several fundamental principles tend to inform the organizations and sites dedicated to open publishing, though they do so to varying degrees. These principles include non-hierarchy, public participation, minimal editorial control, and transparency. Open publishing idea embedded the same concept, although didnt mention Eric S. Raymond's major insight. In Open Publishing problematic content is shallow. Given a large enough audience, peers, readers and commentators, almost all problematic content will be quickly noticed highlighted and fixed. Arnison's Law: "Given enough eyeballs, problematic content is shallow." It should be distinguished from open access publishing, the publishing of material organized in such a way that there is no financial or other barrier to the user. (All or almost all Open pu

lishing is in fact also open access.) Eric Steven Raymond (born December 4, 1957), often referred to as ESR, is an American computer programmer, author and open source software advocate. After the 1997 publication of The Cathedral and the Bazaar, Raymond was for a number of years frequently quoted as an unofficial spokesman for the open source movement.[2] He is also known for his 1990 edit and later updates of the Jargon File, currently in print as the The New Hacker's Dictionary.The advent of user-generated content marked a shift among media organizations from creating online content to providing facilities for amateurs to publish their own content. User generated content has also been characterized as 'Conversational Media', as opposed to the 'Packaged Goods Media' of the past century.[3] The former is a two-way process in contrast to the one-way distribution of the latter. Conversational or two-way media is a key characteristic of so-called Web 2.0 which encourages the publishing of one's own content and commenting on other people's. The role of the passive audience therefore has shifted since the birth of New Media, and an ever-growing number of participatory users are taking advantage of the interactive opportunities, especially on the Internet to create independent content. Grassroots experimentation then generated an innovation in sounds, artists, techniques and associations with audiences which then are being used in mainstream media.[4] The active, participatory and creative audience is prevailing today with relatively accessible media, tools and applications, and its culture is in turn affecting mass media corporations and global audiences.

Menu